Café Cinema: 1895 - 1999

All non-Nolan related film, tv, and streaming discussions.
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ArmandFancypants wrote:
November 22nd, 2018, 6:27 am
spade wrote:
November 22nd, 2018, 6:16 am
Somebody really loves Wilder's Sherlock. But in top 10 of 70s....
As a few other selections on the list will indicate, I'm a sucker for heroes confronted by the decline of an era as a comment on and examination of genre. See also The Three Musketeers, Sanjuro, Unforgiven, Star Trek II, etc.

Wilder was also such a genius that he uses the trappings of a bloated 60s studio roadshow picture to house a deeply melancholic and bitter narrative more reflective of the decade to come. John Huston is the only other guy who could have pulled that off.
I also loved Wilder's take and still is my favorite Holmes movie. Though it just about makes it to my top 10 Wilder. Do you also think of The Long Goodbye in the same breadth?

Sanjuro is my least favorite Kurosawa movie after Drunken Angel. The light hearted nature of the story just didn't work for me. Then again it has been close to 7-8 years since I watched it.

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LelekPL wrote:
November 22nd, 2018, 6:30 am
7. Lifeboat (Hitchcock)

9. Dead of Night (various)

5. The Hill (Lumet)

6. Blow Out (De Palma)
:thumbup: to these in particular as further off the beaten track choices.

Dead of Night along with Went the Day Well? prove that Ealing wasn't a one-trick pony.

The Hill is a part of that great sequence of Lumet 60s films like The Pawnbroker and Fail-Safe. Been dying to see it again, sadly not as a available around here as it should be.
spade wrote:
November 22nd, 2018, 9:05 am
I also loved Wilder's take and still is my favorite Holmes movie. Though it just about makes it to my top 10 Wilder. Do you also think of The Long Goodbye in the same breadth?

Sanjuro is my least favorite Kurosawa movie after Drunken Angel. The light hearted nature of the story just didn't work for me. Then again it has been close to 7-8 years since I watched it.
Yeah, The Long Goodbye is definitely in that same category even though it's been a decade or so since I watched it. It's certainly Altman's most successful "genre" movie, more successful than some later attempts at serving a plot driven narrative.

I typically love things where a light, carefree veneer hides a darker heart beating at the core (it's why I'm drawn to popular music of the 70s for instance) so that might explain the appeal of Sanjuro. The badass hero having to enter a protective state (and being exasperated about it) is also why I love Temple of Doom and Ghost Protocol I guess.

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Haven’t seen it yet but...



🕷️

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New York, New York (Scorsese)

Bordeline unwatchable, that was one of the last remaining Scorsese films to complete his filmography. And it's by far his weakest.

At least an hour too long for what it has to say... and De Niro's character is one of the most unpleasant assholes I've ever seen on film. Never bought the love story.

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Now Where Was I ? wrote:
January 5th, 2019, 1:48 pm
New York, New York (Scorsese)

Bordeline unwatchable, that was one of the last remaining Scorsese films to complete his filmography. And it's by far his weakest.

At least an hour too long for what it has to say... and De Niro's character is one of the most unpleasant assholes I've ever seen on film. Never bought the love story.
On my way with The Color of Money which has a by-the-numbers script, but god did Marty directed the shit out of this movie. And it's absolutely gorgeously shot. It's honestly one of his best photographed-films, there are incredible shots in there. Michael Ballhaus was just killing it in that period (also with Last Temptation), he got less and less interesting as it went on. A pretty fun watch, with a great second hour. First hour was a bit of a struggle. I guess it's controversial, but I loved the ending

Cape Fear, Kundun and Bringing out the Dead left

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Thank god for Marnie Nixon.£

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Master Virgo wrote:
February 21st, 2019, 5:11 pm



Thank god for Audrey Hepburn.£
Fixed.

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Master Virgo wrote:
February 21st, 2019, 5:11 pm



Thank god for Marnie Nixon.£
She obviously did great work on a lot of major musicals, but the flipside is shame on the studios for not having the bravery to back their stars. For a film musical the impetus for great singing prowess is considerably less than the stage

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I love LOOOVE Hepburn and she is without doubt terrific in this role, as far as acting is concerned, but by god, she can't sing. Not that bad when it comes to lower notes, but when her high voice was required, she couldn't help but to fail.

Take "I Could Have Danced All Night" for instance. Her work here borders on dreadful at parts.




Now compare that to Nixon and Andrews.






£

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Okay, you're right, and I would add that Marnie Nixon does a great job not only singing but also acting, considering how she changes the way the character sings during the course of the movie. She also does great with the hispanic accent in West Side Story's "I feel pretty".
Hepburn does sing in Funny face (though the dance numbers are better than the singing ones imo), and of course she sings Moon river (imagine that the producer thought that taking the song off from the movie was an evidence!!).

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